We can never have too much of your yapping

Via Rachel North, I present the return of the most annoying people ever to grace drinks advertising, the Wassup crowd. Don’t click away: it’s worth watching as far as one of them trying to hang himself:

I envisage a followup video based on the Bud-Weis-Er frogs, with a take-your-pick permutation of high-up Republicans taking the place of Louie and the two frogs respectively.

The apparently pointless and self-comforting nature of a lot of satire these past four or even eight years has attracted criticism. A lot of the work has been fairly generic Bush-hitting, which after a while is as easy to do as it is boring to watch. Some has clad itself into tinfoil hats and followed in the footsteps of such nonsensical conspiracy-theorising as Loose Change.

But, as with any genre, the 10% that isn’t rubbish has actually been worth paying attention to, and it’s been honed and toned by being in opposition to the bizarre machinations of the US government. The internet, while largely an intellectual mess, is also a playground for some of the cleverest and most talented satirists. And blogging, with its interlinking and trackbacks, and its relentless practitioners, is a vehicle for—ultimately—transparency. (Commenting is less important to good reportage than the overall web of connections, I think: open to abuse and often popular with interwanderers too lazy to write whole articles themselves.)

This generation of satire is also proving to be rermarkably easy to practise, if you’ve got the nous to start off on the right foot. All you need to do to expose the seedy work of outlets like Fox News and the pundits that work for them is : do your research! Then, just provide side-by-side comparisons of what the say about equivalent issues unfolding in the Democrat and Republican parties. It’s almost a trial for them not to hoist themselves on their own petards.

This is why Republican mouthpieces like Newsbusters daren’t link through to the content they’re commenting on, relying instead on potentially unrepresentative stills. Look at that Newsbusters article: there are precisely zero links in that commentary. Fake bloggers fear comparison; they fear transparency; they fear interconnection and reference; they fear simple investigation and letting the reader make up their own mind.

Maybe the Huffmeister is right: with the internet, we might finally kill Rovian politics. Personally, I’m just having fun on YouTube.

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This entry was posted in amerika, art, blogs, cliques, election, enmity, far_right, humour, journalism, lies, media, nu-media, politics, research, society, truth, understanding, wisdom_of_groups. Bookmark the permalink.

One Response to We can never have too much of your yapping

  1. Tim Ireland says:

    “Fake bloggers fear comparison; they fear transparency; they fear interconnection and reference; they fear simple investigation and letting the reader make up their own mind.”

    Amen.

    Well noted. Well said.

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